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Posts Tagged: Food technology diploma

3 Things Those in Food Technology Training Should Know About Emulsification

With food technology training, aspiring professionals in the field gain a hands-on approach to safety and quality, and the skills to implement quality assurance and regulatory principles. As food creation is grounded in scientific processes, some of this relies on the principles of chemistry.  One process that food technology professionals should understand is emulsification. This is the process of creating an emulsion, the result of what forms when two or more immiscible liquid substances are mixed together.  An emulsion is a type of colloid, but not all colloids are emulsions. A colloid can refer to a mixture of any phases.. READ MORE »

A Good Time to Take Food Technology Courses? Find Out as Ontario Invests in Food Safety

The responsibility to protect consumers from foodborne illness, commonly referred to as food poisoning, belongs to all three levels of government. The average spending on food safety by the provincial Ontario government and municipalities, along with the Federal government, is approximately $105.7 million each year. If you are interested in science and understanding how food makes it onto grocery store shelves or restaurants, a career in food technology might be right for you. Why might this be a good time to train for a career in the food industry? Earlier this year, the Canadian Agricultural Partnership was announced, and the.. READ MORE »

The Food Technology Behind Fortified Cereals

Fortification or enrichment of foods involves either adding vitamins and minerals to food products, or replacing micronutrients that are lost when the food is processed. Fortification isn’t just a choice made by companies. In Canada there are laws that set requirements around fortification of certain foods. For example, vitamin C must be added to vegetable drinks and vitamins A and D are mandatory in margarine. Many nutrients are also designated as “voluntary”, or optional, for example those added to breakfast cereals.  These voluntary nutrients include: Thiamine Niacin Vitamin B6 Folic acid Pantothenic acid Magnesium Iron Zinc These nutrients serve to.. READ MORE »

3 Facts About the International Food Safety Conference for Food Technology Diploma Students

The First International Food Safety Conference is bringing attention to the issue of food safety. Here’s what students in food quality training should know.

What Students in Quality Control Training Courses Need to Know About Food Fermentation

Fermentation is a method used in food production that is as old as human civilization. Involving the use of microorganisms (yeast, bacteria, or mold) to change the properties of food, it has brought the world alcoholic beverages and delicious foods like bread, yogurt, cheese, pickles, and much more. Fermentation has some interesting effects, which have made it a popular method of extending the lifespan of foods and of making interesting alterations to their flavours. Curious about what food fermentation has to offer? Here’s what students who want to work in quality control for food need to know. Fermentation Is a.. READ MORE »

3 Tips for Improved Teamwork During Food Technology Training

Working as part of a team during your studies is an exciting opportunity to gain valuable teamwork skills before starting your career. Although teamwork may not always be easy, collaborating with a diverse group of individuals can help you achieve even more than you would have working on your own. Being an effective team member that contributes in a positive way requires practice and awareness. You don’t necessarily have to be a leader or be outgoing to be a great asset to your team. Every single person in a team has something unique to contribute to the group’s success. Read.. READ MORE »

Pros With Food Technology Training Have Developed Healthy Ice Cream!

Getting people to eat healthy food is difficult at times, which is why some products try to pack in extra nutrients to “trick” eaters into being a little healthier. To that end, a couple of different companies have set themselves the task of creating healthy ice cream products. The mission: taste like the regular thing, but pack in nutrients you won’t find in the average tub. The results? According to tasters, so far, so good. Curious about the development of new food products and the fascinating world of food technology? Here’s a quick peek at two of the bigger names.. READ MORE »

3 New Food Technology Developments That Will Change the Way We Eat

Since the 14th century, the global population has been continuously growing. On average, the population increases by 158 people per minute and 83 million people per year. That rapid population growth means that we must continue to find innovative, scalable ways to produce enough food to meet future demand. If you’re interested in food safety and technology, new developments in the food industry will likely have a big impact on your future career. Here are three new developments in the food industry that you might one day encounter. 1. Sprays that Fight Food-borne Bacteria Are Being Developed As students completing.. READ MORE »

4 Food Truck Safety Practices for Food Technology Training Students to Know

In 1936 famed hot dog producer Oscar Mayer launched its mobile hot dog cart named The Weiner Mobile. Since then, street food has gone through an extraordinary evolution, beginning with Kogi BBQ, a Korean-taco truck that is known as the first gourmet food truck. After the success of Kogi, the food truck industry blossomed into a $1.2 billion dollar industry in the U.S. and an almost $300 million dollar industry in Canada. With this rise in popularity there has been a synonymous rise in the health and safety regulations for food trucks, as food safety professionals work hard to ensure.. READ MORE »

The Benefits of Improved Traceability: A Food Safety Student’s Guide

Today’s consumers want to know more about the health and safety of their food. The “farm-to-table” or “factory-to-table” movement has consumers expecting comprehensive information about where food comes from and how it is handled. In a word: traceability. Increasing traceability is now a collaborative effort among today’s businesses, trade associations, industry groups, and regulatory agencies. Food quality assurance professionals are driven by government regulations and consumer pressure to promote improved traceability using consistent, interoperable data-sharing processes based on global standards. If you are planning to pursue a food safety career, read on to learn the benefits of traceability in today’s food.. READ MORE »

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