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Clinical Research

Students Getting a Clinical Research Diploma: The FDA Approved a Lung Cancer Vaccine for Clinical Trial!

Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in Canada, as well as the leading cause of cancer related deaths. It even causes more deaths than the next three major cancers combined. Although there has been a substantial drop in lung cancer diagnosis over the past 20 years, there is plenty that needs to be done before the disease is preventable and completely treatable. Researchers are looking to trial new drugs that take a different approach from current invasive treatment options. A new lung cancer vaccine approved by the FDA uses immunotherapy to target cancer cells. If you’re interested in.. READ MORE »

Pharmaceutical Quality Assurance Pros Rejoice: A New Alzheimer’s Drug May Slow Mental Decline

It is estimated by the Alzheimer Society of Canada that about 564,000 Canadians will suffer from dementia in 2016. Medical professionals will diagnose an additional 25,000 cases every single year, and by 2031 it is believed the number of patients suffering from dementia will rise to 937,000. Dementia is a huge problem not only in Canada, but across the globe. Unfortunately, there haven’t been any significant scientific breakthroughs that could slow the progress of the disease—until now. If you’re a student enrolled in a pharmaceutical program, you may understand the groundbreaking impact this scientific breakthrough could bring to dementia patients… READ MORE »

Adverse Effects VS Adverse Drug Reactions: 3 Differences for Students in Clinical Research Training

New drugs are developed, tested, processed, marketed, and then eventually released to the public every year. During their rigorous testing process, side effects arise in clinical trial patients and are noted by doctors. It is common for drugs to enter the market with a list of side effects, some being beneficial, but most being negative. These negative side effects are known as adverse effects. After a drug has been released to the market, there are systems in place so that healthcare professionals can report any new issues or serious reactions to drug. These are known as adverse drug reactions (ADRs)… READ MORE »

What Does the ‘Fitbit’ Lawsuit Mean For Clinical Research Careers

Wrist-worn heart rate tracking devices from companies like Fitbit are big business, and not just with athletes. According to recent estimates, there are over 100 medical studies in the United States alone that involve Fitbit devices, with several more that use bands from competing companies. The intended benefit of using these devices in studies is that they should allow researchers to collect quantitative data about their patients’ health, negating the need to use unreliable self-reported information. Research from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, though, suggests that Fitbit’s continuous heart rate tracking “do[es] not accurately measure a user’s heart rate,” which.. READ MORE »

How Clinical Research Training Fits into the FDA’s 5-Step Drug Development Process

Every year, new drugs are put on the market with the intention of providing relief for suffering patients. These drugs have gone through years of research, testing, trials, and applications in order to be approved. Therefore, patients have some assurance that the drugs on the market meet certain safety and quality standards. To make that assurance, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), much like Health Canada, uses a five-step drug development process. If you’re interested in a clinical research career, it is important to know each step in the process, as there is frequent collaboration between both governing bodies. Read.. READ MORE »

How Vitamins are Measured by Professionals with HPLC Training

The understanding that vitamins are essential to good health goes without saying, but what exactly is a vitamin? Vitamins are organic compounds that are vital for the body. When an organism cannot produce, or synthesize, a compound sufficiently in their body, and therefore must obtain it through diet, the compound is then called a vitamin. In order for people to understand which foods contain which vitamins and in what amount, High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) methods are used by HPLC professionals to isolate and measure how much of a particular vitamin is in each food. Continue reading to discover how.. READ MORE »

Historic Canadian Medical Developments to Inspire Students in Clinical Research Training

Canada has long been known as a major player in the field of medical research. Despite only ranking 38th worldwide in terms of population, it ranks 14th in medical research spending and 6th in research paper production. As a country, it is responsible for developing entirely new fields of medicine, more effective surgical methods, and innovative, life-saving treatments. These medical developments could not have happened without the abundance of time, resources, ingenuity, and support provided throughout the medical community—from researchers to clinical trial operators to doctors, and including everyone in between. If you’re interested in clinical research and drug safety,.. READ MORE »

3 Life-Saving Discoveries Made this Summer by Clinical Research Career Pros

Medicine and clinical research technology have been progressing at breakneck speed, and producing some exciting results. New emergences from medical research teams tackling multiple sclerosis (MS) and epilepsy are painting a promising picture of the future. Professionals working in clinical research are consistently involved in the evolution of medicine. The following are a few examples of some exciting new developments in clinical research that may change lives and improve the health of many Canadians. Read on to discover some new life-saving discoveries made in clinical research! 1. A New High-Risk Therapy for Those with MS Created by Pros in Clinical.. READ MORE »

3 Ways Crowdfunding Could Impact the Future of Clinical Research Careers

Clinical studies are the way in which doctors and researchers discover new and innovate ways to prevent, diagnose, and treat illnesses, but there is no way around it; research is expensive. During the 2013/2014 fiscal year, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research spent one billion dollars on the creation, dissemination, and application of health research knowledge. Even with such a large amount of funding available, though, obtaining some of that funding for clinical research can be competitive and this likely stalls some research projects that could provide huge benefits to Canadians. With the emergence of crowdfunding—funding collected online directly from.. READ MORE »

The Race to a Vaccine: What Pros with Clinical Research Careers are Doing to Beat Zika

The World Health Organization officially declared the current Zika virus outbreak as a global health emergency last month. Zika, which is transmitted through mosquitoes, was previously thought to only cause mild symptoms in sufferers, and was mainly confined to Africa and some parts of South East Asia. However, with the disease spreading rapidly throughout the Americas, and recent unconfirmed links to fetal abnormalities, the race is on to find a cure. Clinical trials of potential vaccines are now being planned by Indian company Bharat Biotech and the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Disease in the United States. Read on.. READ MORE »

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