Life Sciences Offer Women Ground-breaking Research Opportunities

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Dr. Cheryl Rockman-Greenberg heads up a cutting edge, Toronto-based medical research team that is not at all unusual in its gender breakdown.
Photo source: wrha.mb.ca

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Medicine) jobs are generally considered to be a vital part of the economy, and one of the hottest sectors for employment and education investment. As an added bonus, STEM offers a unique chance for female researchers and inventors to be on the cutting edge of this century’s new discoveries.

Biological and life sciences are experiencing a global boom. From newer and better life extending and improving treatments and technologies, to expanding the understanding of the human body and its potential, medical technology that was science fiction a decade ago is taken for granted. Discoveries in other fields, such as materials science or sophisticated, computer-based statistical analysis, are being adopted and adapted. The general pace of new discoveries only accelerates every year.

Women on the cutting edge of medical innovation

While women participate in all the growth fields, other parts of STEM such as engineering and computer science hover below 20% popularity for female university students. Medicine, pharmaceutical studies, biology, nursing and other crucial life science courses tip strongly in the opposite direction. Whether preparing for the CRNE exam or getting ready to look for investors for the next round of clinical research, women are already positioned to drive the field forward.

These breakthroughs are also a chance for women to close the salary gap. Cutting edge research is generally extremely well compensated, especially as pharmaceutical companies look to extend the reach of the patent libraries and intend to spend hundreds of millions in the coming years to do it. This also makes career paths like pharmaceutical quality assurance a great investment for women who care about future earnings. Yet another reason for there to be a female medical researcher on the hundred dollar bill!

If you’re a woman in life sciences, what attracted you to the field?